June 26, 2007

YouTuesday

Every Tuesday during the summer, I'm going to scour the salvage yard of user-generated content for the Web's best college basketball-related clips to help pass the time until the official start of practice on Oct. 15.

  • A draft theme pervades this week's edition. Here's a lengthy vid of the first-ever NBA Draft lottery from 1985. Did the envelope with the New York have a bent corner so a younger, svelter David Stern would know which one to pull, as conspiracy theorists have long purported? You be the the judge -- around the 4:50 mark.

  • No one in sports gets more out of his body than Allen Iverson, who became the smallest No. 1 overall pick in history during the opening stages of the 1996 NBA Draft. That was just the start for A.I., who would become the smallest scoring champ and smallest MVP award winner in league history during his 10-and-a-half seasons with the Philadelphia 76ers.

  • Here's a Chuck gem from 1997. Miffed that San Antonio appeared to be resting healthy players during the later stages of the season with the hopes of winning the Tim Duncan sweepstakes, Sir Charles issued a Cassandra-like warning that the Spurs would reap what they sowed.

"There's a moral thing about sports. They cheated and good things don't happen to people who cheat. ... When you rest healthy players so you can get the No. 1 pick in the draft, that's cheating. That's not the way the draft was designed and God does not look good upon that. ... I think in life you get what you deserve. If you're a good person, good things happen to you. If you do things wrong, bad things happen to you. ... I don't care about their potential, I don't even care about their team. I just know that if you cheat in sports or if you cheat in whatever you do, bad things are going to happen to you."
    Four World Championships later, it's clear the basketball gods didn't care about San Antonio and were busy aligning against Beantown, another team accused of tanking games to get Duncan. (The Celts ended up with the No. 3 pick and took undercooked Colorado underclassman Chauncey Billups, who wouldn't blossom until his last season with Minnesota in 2002.)

June 19, 2007

YouTuesday

Every Tuesday during the summer, I'm going to scour the salvage yard of user-generated content for the Web's best college basketball-related clips to help pass the time until the official start of practice on Oct. 15.

  • One of the more overlooked buzzer-beaters in NCAA Tournament lore occurred on Mar. 21, 1992, when seventh-seeded Georgia Tech stunned second-seeded Southern California -- led by future two-time Slam Dunk champ Harold Miner -- on a James Forrest three-pointer as time expired. Al McGuire's famous call of the play ("Holy mackerel! Holy mackerel!") still sends chills up the spines of Tech fans.

  • A personal favorite: A highlight reel of Allen Iverson's exploits on the gridiron from high school. As a junior, the future Georgetown cager earned All-State honors at the quarterback postion (also putting in time at running back, safety, punt returner and kick returner). The Answer would lead Bethel to a Virginia state championship in the fall -- before leading the basketball team to another state title in the winter. Don't miss his monster hit to break up a passing play at the 0:38 mark.

  • Here's an anecdote for the trivia file: David Barrett originally penned "One Shining Moment" -- the signature anthem of March Madness -- in a 20-minute rush of inspiration after watching a Larry Bird highlight reel. Once CBS Sports creative director Doug Towey got a hold of the tune through Armen Keteyian (a high school friend of Barrett's), the song was earmarked for the network's coverage of Superbowl XXI -- after the first line was altered from The ball is tipped to The ball is kicked. As it turned out, the game and subsequent player interviews ran long and the network had to rush to their post-game show at the expense of the song's debut. Rather than wait until the following January, CBS changed the opening lyric back and the rest is NCAA Tournament history. Here's the very first "One Shining Moment" which ran just minutes after Keith Smart's clutch jumper sunk Syracuse and brought Indiana its fifth national championship. (Check out the mullet on Florida's Dwayne Schintzius during the first 10 seconds. Yikes!)

June 11, 2007

YouTuesday

Every Tuesday during the summer, I'm going to scour the salvage yard of user-generated content for the Web's best college basketball-related clips to help pass the time until the official start of practice on Oct. 15.

  • I was still a couple months away from my eighth birthday on Jan. 4, 1990 as I walked into a sold-out Alumni Memorial Fieldhouse to see Saint Joseph's host Paul Westhead's high-octane Loyola Marymount team -- a side that featured Philly natives Bo Kimble and Hank Gathers, the attached-at-the-hip duo who had led Dobbins Tech to a Public League championship five years prior. The Lions employed a frenzied approach, seldom holding the ball for 10 seconds before putting up a shot and playing a full-court press for the entire 40 minutes. That year's team would break a number of NCAA records before finishing the season in the Elite Elite -- just weeks after Gathers collapsed and died as a result of a heart condition during the WCC Tournament. While the '89-90 season remains one of the more forgettable campaigns in St. Joe's history, the Hawks put forth one of their more memorable efforts of the year and appeared to be headed to overtime after tying the game at 96-96 -- but time still remained for a Bo Kimble prayer.

  • No one who was watching the NCAA Tournament on St. Patrick's Day in 1996 will ever forget Texas Tech's Darvin Ham doing his best Chocolate Thunder during his team's second-round victory over North Carolina. Washington Post photog Joel Richardson captured the moment for a famous Sports Illustrated cover.

  • One of the more colorful (and overlooked) Final Four teams from the 1990s hailed from Stillwater. In 1995, the brawny, cornfed frontcourt of Scott Pierce and Bryant "Big Country" Reeves took down Massachusetts to advance to the college basketball's biggest stage. Verne Lundquist and Quinn Buckner handle postgame interviews with the Pokes in this clip.

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