Cotton Bowl Your Next BCS Bowl?

By Adam Caparell - February 27, 2007


Weather was the biggest reason why the Cotton Bowl decided to pack up and head to the Dallas Cowboys new stadium in 2010, but one of college football's most historic and prestigious postseason games looks to be jockeying for a role in an expanded BCS.

The Cotton Bowl Athletic Association announced Monday that it's leaving the venerable Cotton Bowl in Dallas for the new digs in Arlington once construction is complete on the Cowboys $1 billion home in three years.

And after the BCS contract is up after the 2010 season and if a tweak or change is made to the format - as has been speculated - adding a fifth venue to the mix, Cotton Bowl officials believe they'd be the perfect addition to the rotation in a brand new stadium.

"We have the portfolio to be a player," CBAA President Rick Baker said. "Just looking at the landscape, it makes sense that if they add a city for the BCS that they look to the state of Texas."

Dallas' central location - in relation to the sites of the other four BCS games (L.A., Arizona, New Orleans and Miami) - along with a climate controlled facility could make it an extremely attractive choice to join the fray.

Also boding well for the Cotton Bowl's BCS aspirations are the fact that its televised on Fox, who now owns the rights to the BCS, has a big title sponsor in AT&T and has local heavyweights who are concerned about its prosperity (like Texas Rangers owner Tom Hicks).

"We don't really control the BCS process," Baker said. "All we can do is put us in the very best position if there is a tweak or change in the process."

The move to Arlington really got rolling after CBAA officials surveyed ticket holders and influential college football personalities about switching the game's venue. The results were overwhelmingly in favor of leaving the original Cotton Bowl, an old and out-dated facility - that's hosted the game since 1937.

CBAA officials found out from the survey that the game’s tradition and history weren't big enough obstacles to keep it where it was and that weather and stadium facilities were the two biggest complaints about the game. They wanted to ensure the Cotton Bowl remains an attractive bowl destination and they couldn't keep doing that in an ancient facility, one so old that over $50 million in renovations couldn't keep the game from leaving.

The bowl game's move won't affect the Texas-Oklahoma game whatsoever, considering the weather during the fall is never a problem when the Texas State Fair serves as a background for the annual Red River Rivalry. The weather is too unpredictable, however, in January for everyone's liking. And that's not good for business. A BCS game, on the other hand, is.

Posted by Adam Caparell at 04:20 PM on February 27, 2007
Comments (1)

Comments

WHAT HAPPENED? THE COTTON BOWL USED TO BE ONE OF THE MAJORS BUT IN RECENT YEARS HAS REVERTED TO A SECOND TEAR BOWL. THIS IS MOST UNACCEPTABLE AFTER THE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES THAT HAVE BEEN DECIDED THERE OVER THE PAST YEARS. WHY THEN DID A COMPANY BASED IN DALLAS, FRITO- LAY NOT DO ANYTHING ABOUT THAT SITUATION INSTEAD OF PUTTING ALL THEIR MONEY INTO THE FIESTA BOWL WHILE ELEVATING THAT ONCE THIRD RATE BOWL TO MAJOR STATUS. SHAME ON FRITO-LAY, IF YOU LOVE THE PHOENIX, ARIZONA AREA SO MUCH WHY DON'T YOU MOVE THERE?

Post A Comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

The Sloggers... Categories CSTV.com Links Blogroll Archives...